1. Foreword and Introduction

Showing comments and forms 1 to 11 of 11

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67855

Received: 15/05/2019

Respondent: Ms Jenny Langridge

Representation:

I support all sections of the Village Design Statement. In particular Section 9, I support the extension of the bridleway network. And section 10 - community green space, I would add that trees are especially important within these areas - not just playing fields.

Full text:

I support all sections of the Village Design Statement. In particular Section 9, U spport the extension of the bridleway netwodk. And section 10 - community green space, I would add that trees are esepcially important within these areas - not just playing fields.

Attachments:

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67856

Received: 10/07/2019

Respondent: . Wendy & John Norton

Representation:

Conceptually it provides what will maintain the village as most villages want to be. Will it be adhered to over time? That is the key issue. It relies on the infrastructure keeping pace which currently it does not.

Full text:

Conceptually it provides what will maintain the village as most villages want to be. Will it be adhered to over time? That is the key issue. It relies on the infrastructure keeping pace which currently it does not.

Attachments:

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67858

Received: 30/04/2019

Respondent: Ms Lisa Veit

Representation:

Very well done and in keeping with the village sentiment - thanks for listening, let's hope that the developers do as well.

Full text:

Very well done and in keeping with the village sentiment - thanks for listening, let's hope that the developers do as well.

Attachments:

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67859

Received: 10/07/2019

Respondent: Ms Claire Daniel

Representation:

I support a plan for the village. For me the importance is to protect the High Street which is really busy now and dangerous. Keeping a village feel is very important too.

Full text:

I support a plan for the village. For me the importance is to protect the High Street which is really busy now and dangerous. Keeping a village feel is very important too.

Attachments:

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67861

Received: 15/05/2019

Respondent: Ms Vicki Bidwell

Representation:

Please the VDG has brought out the green spaces as important, capturing flooding issue as a priority and protects viewpoints and character in new developments to promote. Thank you for supporting this valuable project!

Full text:

Well written, well presented planning document. Captured villages comments and their views on character. We need to retain and protect.

a concise document which identifies the key principles and views.

Attachments:

Support

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67875

Received: 29/05/2019

Respondent: Cambridge Past Present and Future

Representation:

Cambridge PPF support the village SPDs. A general commen is made about green infrastructure being important and that the principle of retaining or enhancing the connectivity of habitats within and adjacent to the villages is incorporated within these SPDs.

Full text:

Dear Cllr Hawkins
RE: Village Design Guide SPD Consultations for Caldecote, Fulbourn, Gamlingay, Over, Papworth Everard, Sawston and Swavesey
We are Cambridge's largest civic society run by local people who are passionate about where they live, and interested in making places more attractive, enjoyable and distinctive. Working with our members, supporters and volunteers we:
* Manage green spaces and historic buildings in and around the city for people and nature
* Champion high quality planning and the sustainable development of Cambridge and its surrounds
* Run a successful education and events programme teaching people of all ages about local heritage

Cambridge Past, Present & Future have spoken with a representative from one of the villages involved in this process and as a result, CambridgePPF is confident that the views of local residents has been considered and we support the process that has been carried out to draft these SPDs.
We believe that these will be valuable in influencing, for the better, the design of any future developments in and around these settlements. We therefore support these village SPDs.
We would like to make one general comment that would apply to all village design SPDs, relating to green infrastructure. The need to connect green infrastructure within the villages is very important if we are to nneet aspirations to halt the loss of biodiversity and ideally see a net-gain.
This means making sure that new developments are laid out in such a way that they do not sever green infrastructure and ideally, they help to connect it. This includes "private" spaces such as gardens as well as public spaces such as parks and verges. We would recommend that the principle of retaining or enhancing the connectivity of habitats within and adjacent to the villages is incorporated into these SPDs.

Attachments:

Comment

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67882

Received: 28/05/2019

Respondent: BPHA

Representation:

Overall bpha are supportive of the approach taken within the South Cambridgeshire Village Design Statements.

Affordable housing should be addressed in the Village Design Statements.

The approach taken to the appropriate materials to be used within new development is broadly supported. The Village Design Guides should strike a balance between innovation and following a rigid design approach with reference to Modern Methods of Construction

We would strongly support improvements being made to the public realm to contribute towards the viability of local service provision within village centres.

Full text:

Overall bpha are supportive of the approach taken within the South Cambridgeshire Village Design Statements.
bpha is a registered not for profit affordable housing provider with over 18,000 homes within the Cambridge to Oxford arc. We are committed to building and maintaining quality affordable homes in thriving communities.
More information can be found at — www.bpha.org.uk

bpha have a commitment to provide well-designed high quality housing for our customers. Our approach to delivery is informed by key financial viability considerations. We look forward to working with SCDC to deliver a range of housing opportunities for your residents that is financially sustainable and reflects that addresses the design issues raised in the statement.

As an organisation bpha are looking to increase the number of homes that we provide through land-led opportunities. The Village Design Guides provide a useful insight into the important design issues at a neighbourhood level that we will consider early in the development design and planning process. We remain committed to working with SCDC in order to find appropriate design responses to housing development.

We are currently in contract with various developers across multiple sites in the South Cambridgeshire area. Most notable locally is that bpha are contracted to deliver all affordable homes on Phase 1 at Northstowe. Via our Market sale arm Bushmead Homes we have acquired open market sites in Over, Swavesey and Gamlingay to deliver market sale and affordable homes.

Please find attached below comments on the Village Design Statements. Should you have any questions on the points raised please do not hesitate in contacting me.

In terms of an overall comment the Village Design Statements cover seven villages across South Cambridgeshire. What would be helpful is also identifying important design considerations for those villages that sit outside the areas covered by the Village Design Statements. We are currently actively looking at rural exception sites across South Cambridgeshire and such guidance would be useful.

In relatoin to the content of the Village Design Statements. The broad comments that can be read across all the statements can be summarised into the following categories:

Affordable Housing - the deliery of new affordable housing is key to the delivery of the strategic objectives of bpha. In terms of village sustainability the delivery of affordable homes to meet the needs of the local community is vital. This requires the delivery of a broad range and tenure of homes.

While there is reference to the importance of well-designed affordable housing such as in the case of Robinson Court, Gamlingay, many of the statements are silent on the issue of affordable housing. The planning system should balance the demand of particular the types of affordable housing within a village with the requirements of the densikty parameters set out in the Village Design Statements. Therefore the approach to meeting specific housing needs should be addressed in the Village Design Statements. Consideration to the Nationally Prescribed Space Standards, Lifetime Homes and Building Regulation accessibility/adaptability ought to considered.

Materials - the approach to taken to the appropriate materials to be used within new developments is broadly supported. It is welcomed that the document refers to the type of materials that are likely to be acceptable without specifying specific products.

The availability of materials is a critical factor for development delivery, with the lead in times for materials such as bricks having a significant impact on a development programme. Therefore we would welcome a dialogue with SCDC early in the development process of a broad palette of products that would be acceptable. This is cruicial for our cost planning of developments.

The Village Design Statements should also recognise that in relation to innovation in the building industry through Modern Methods of Construction to include off-site and modular housing. A sustainability balance should be struck between innovation and following a rigid design approach.

Public Realm Investment - In the case of the larger villages reference such as Sawston and Fulbourn reference is made to the need for public realm improvements being made to the local centre. We would strongly support improvements being made the public realm to contribute towards the viability of local service provision within village centres.

In terms of specific comments, we have the following comments on the individual Village Design Statements:

Caldecote

Support the principles of partnership working on flood management. There is no mention of affordable housing within the statement this should be addressed.

Fulbourn

The following statement is made 'The need for a housing mix including suitable dwellings for the elderly and for younger households' is identifed as not an issue to be addressed with the Village Design Statement. This is not correct as the approach taken to density in the Statements will affect the delivery of certain types of affordable housing.

The objective for an improved High Street is supported as improvements to the public realm will support the financial viability of local services as it will create a better environment to visit.

In relation to improvements to existing stock there needs to be a consideration of wider issues such as External Wall Insulation and the acceptability of such changes.

At paragraph 10.13 reference is made to self build reference in addition the reference should be extended to include custom build.

Gamlingay

Broad support to the reference that affordable housing can play in village i.e. Robinson Court. The reference to taking influence from non-residential uses in housing such as agricultural and live work influences is welcomed

Over

At paragraph 4.5 it is stated 'Development should seek to maintain and enhance wildlife corridors in ways that are not costly to maintain.' The importance of wildlife corridors is supported as is the recognition that this should be undertaken in a cost effective way.

We support the proposals for better linkages to the guided busway. Mobility is critical for access to jobs and services and it is recognised that access to a car is lower for those on lower incomes.

At paragraph 8.7 it is stated 'Surface of green lanes should be permeable and easy to maintain'. We support the provision of a green land network this should consider the whole life costing of mterials to be used. In addition consideration should be given to the materials being acceptable for cycling. Sustrans give useful guidance in the following document: www.sustrans.org.uk/sites/default/files/images/files/migrated-pdfs/Technical%20Note%208%20-%20Path%20surfaces(1).pdf

Papworth Everard

The statement makes a strong emphasis on corridors for movement, the point made above on Over is of relevance here.

Sawston

The use of terraces to raise densities is supported.
The proposed public realm improvements and frontages is supported although an appropriate upfront capital budget is important it is also critical that there is a long-term revenue maintenance budget

Swavesey

Support the need for collaborative working on flood risk. In relation to the requirement for low carbon housing this should take into account the need for schemes to be viable with a sustainable maintenance strategy. Consider design implications of electrical generation (solar PVs) due to the shift to electric cars etc.

Attachments:

Comment

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67889

Received: 23/04/2019

Respondent: Forestry Commission England

Representation:

One of the main criteria which needs to be considered in species choice re climate change. We hope all the villages will consider how the can use trees to reduce the impact of climate change. Where villages have Ancient Woodland in close proximity, the design guides need to refer to the government policy set out in the Joint Standing Advice of Natural England and the Forstrey Commission. Ask is no longer an option to planting due to ask dieback and should be replaced by sycamore.

Full text:

For the Attention of Hana Loftus,

Thank you for consulting the Forestry Commission on the village design guides. Our points are general points which might apply to more than one village design guide.

Some of the villages have said they want to plant trees and have listed that they want native tree species and have listed which ones, one of these we looked at included ash. It should be noted that ash is no longer available as an option for planting as there is a moratorium on the of movement of ash due to ash dieback Hymenoscyphus fraxineus which causes a lethal disease of ash in a number of ash species. Sycamore is an accepted substitute for ash as this species provides a similar ecosystem for the many species found on the ash tree and is an honorary native species. The other tree which has been listed in one village is cedar, for clarity this is not a native species, but then many very attractive trees are not native.

What is more important going forward one of the main criteria which needs to be considered in species choice will be climate change. The key concern is the right species for the soil and climate conditions. The Forestry Commission recommends that to address the issue of resilience to climate change there is a need to look at the provenance of species, which means there is a need to use, for example, oak trees sourced from 2-3 degrees south e.g. ( south of Paris). There is an online tool available to choose the right species for the soils and site conditions called Ecological Site Classification tool http://www.forestdss.org.uk/geoforestdss/esc4.jsp. This tool can suggest suitable species with the right inputs.

Our second main point is regarding Ancient Semi Natural Woodland. Where villages have Ancient Woodland in close proximity, the design guides need to refer to the government policy set out in the Joint Standing Advice of Natural England and the Forestry Commission https://www.gov.uk/guidance/ancient-woodland-and-veteran-trees-protection-surveys-licences, this advice also covers Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS) and veteran trees. We also note that though Natural England is mentioned at the end of some design guides with regard to Ancient Woodland and that they need consulting, this relates mainly to a SSSI whereas the Forestry Commission is a non-statutory consultee for any planning proposed within 500metres of any Ancient Woodland or PAWs, however reference should be made to the Standing Advice in the first instance.

Lastly, going back to the theme of climate change we hope that all the villages will consider how they can use trees to reduce the impact of climate change and also reduce their carbon footprint trees can be a significant asset to a community both in terms of shade, pollution absorption and place setting. I have attached a research paper which gives more information. Mainly its about urban areas but it will also apply to large new developments.

If there is an option a community woodland https://www.communitywoodland.org/why/ can also add a significant asset to a village for health and in terms of carbon footprint and natural capital.

I hope you find this useful.

Attachments:

Comment

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67896

Received: 24/04/2019

Respondent: Natural England

Representation:

"The SPDs could consider making provision for Green Infrastructure within development. This should be in line with any GI strategy covering your area.
The SPD could consider incorporating features which are beneficial to wildlife within development
The SPD may provide opportunities to enhance the character and local distinctiveness through green infrastructure and contact with nature."

Full text:

Dear Hana Loftus

South Cambridgeshire District Council - Village Design Guide Supplementary Planning Document (SPD)

Thank you for your consultation on the above dated 11 April 2019, which was received by Natural England on 11 April 2019.

Natural England is a non-departmental public body. Our statutory purpose is to ensure that the natural environment is conserved, enhanced, and managed for the benefit of present and future generations, thereby contributing to sustainable development.

Our remit includes protected sites and landscapes, biodiversity, geodiversity, soils, protected species, landscape character, green infrastructure and access to and enjoyment of nature.

While we welcome this opportunity to give our views, the topic this Supplementary Planning Document covers is unlikely to have major effects on the natural environment, but may nonetheless have some effects. We therefore do not wish to provide specific comments, but advise you to consider the following issues:

Green Infrastructure
This SPD could consider making provision for Green Infrastructure (GI) within development. This should be in line with any GI strategy covering your area.

The National Planning Policy Framework states that local planning authorities should plan 'positively for the creation, protection, enhancement and management of networks of biodiversity and green infrastructure'. The Planning Practice Guidance on Green Infrastructure provides more detail on this.

Urban green space provides multi-functional benefits. It contributes to coherent and resilient ecological networks, allowing species to move around within, and between, towns and the countryside with even small patches of habitat benefitting movement. Urban GI is also recognised as one of the most effective tools available to us in managing environmental risks such as flooding and heat waves. Greener neighbourhoods and improved access to nature can also improve public health and quality of life and reduce environmental inequalities.

There may be significant opportunities to retrofit green infrastructure in urban environments. These can be realised through:
* green roof systems and roof gardens;
* green walls to provide insulation or shading and cooling;
* new tree planting or altering the management of land (e.g. management of verges to enhance biodiversity).

You could also consider issues relating to the protection of natural resources, including air quality, ground and surface water and soils within urban design plans.

Further information on GI is include within The Town and Country Planning Association's "Design Guide for Sustainable Communities" and their more recent "Good Practice Guidance for Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity".

Biodiversity enhancement
This SPD could consider incorporating features which are beneficial to wildlife within development, in line with paragraph 118 of the National Planning Policy Framework. You may wish to consider providing guidance on, for example, the level of bat roost or bird box provision within the built structure, or other measures to enhance biodiversity in the urban environment. An example of good practice includes the Exeter Residential Design Guide SPD, which advises (amongst other matters) a ratio of one nest/roost box per residential unit.

Landscape enhancement
The SPD may provide opportunities to enhance the character and local distinctiveness of the surrounding natural and built environment; use natural resources more sustainably; and bring benefits for the local community, for example through green infrastructure provision and access to and contact with nature. Landscape characterisation and townscape assessments, and associated sensitivity and capacity assessments provide tools for planners and developers to consider how new development might makes a positive contribution to the character and functions of the landscape through sensitive siting and good design and avoid unacceptable impacts.

For example, it may be appropriate to seek that, where viable, trees should be of a species capable of growth to exceed building height and managed so to do, and where mature trees are retained on site, provision is made for succession planting so that new trees will be well established by the time mature trees die.

Other design considerations
The NPPF includes a number of design principles which could be considered, including the impacts of lighting on landscape and biodiversity (para 125).

Strategic Environmental Assessment/Habitats Regulations Assessment
A SPD requires a Strategic Environmental Assessment only in exceptional circumstances as set out in the Planning Practice Guidance here. While SPDs are unlikely to give rise to likely significant effects on European Sites, they should be considered as a plan under the Habitats Regulations in the same way as any other plan or project. If your SPD requires a Strategic Environmental Assessment or Habitats Regulation Assessment, you are required to consult us at certain stages as set out in the Planning Practice Guidance.

Should the plan be amended in a way which significantly affects its impact on the natural environment, then, please consult Natural England again.

Please send all planning consultations electronically to the consultation hub at consultations@naturalengland.org.uk.

Attachments:

Comment

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67903

Received: 30/04/2019

Respondent: Cambridgeshire Constabulary

Representation:

Secured by Design for all new housing and commercial development can be achieved to create a safe and secure environment. Developers should, at an early stage, seek advice from the Police Desiging Out Crime Offiers at Cambridgeshire Police Headquarters.

Full text:

I would like these comments be made applicable to each of the Design Guides (Caldecote, Fulbourn, Gamlingay, Over, Papworth Everard, Sawston and Swavesey).
Developers should ensure that crime prevention is considered as an integral part of the initial design of any development and not as an afterthought. Development should incorporate the principles of 'Secured by Design'. In particular they will need to demonstrate how their development proposal has addressed the following issues, in order to design out crime to avoid the creation of opportunities for crime:
* Natural Surveillance of public and semi‐private spaces, in particular, entrances to a development, paths, play areas, open spaces and car parks.
* Defensible space and the clear definition, differentiation and robust separation of public, private and semiprivate space, so that all the spaces are clearly defined and adequately protected in terms of their use and ownership.
* Consideration for some lighting, in particular shared parking courts and footpaths.
* Design and layout of pedestrian, cycle and vehicle routes into and within the site, including how these integrate with existing patterns in the village.
* Landscaping and planting, in particular, potential hiding places and dark or secluded areas should not be created.

Attachments:

Comment

Draft Swavesey Village Design Guide SPD

Representation ID: 67910

Received: 30/05/2019

Respondent: Sport England

Representation:

Sport England supports the development of safe pedestrian and cycle routes through all new developments, but the reference should be widened to refer also to the need to design new development to improve opportunities for all types of formal and informal sport and physical activity.

Full text:

Sport England supports the development of safe pedestrian and cycle routes through all developments, but the reference should be widened to refer also to the need to design new development to improve opportunities for all types of formal and informal sport and physical activity..
Sport England, in conjunction with Public Health England, has produced 'Active Design' (October 2015), a guide to planning new developments that create the right environment to help people get more active, more often, in the interests of health and wellbeing. The guidance sets out ten key principles for ensuring new developments incorporate opportunities for people to take part in sport and physical activity. The Active Design principles are aimed at contributing towards the Government's desire for the planning system to promote healthy communities through good urban design. Sport England would commend the use of the guidance in the master planning process for new residential developments, and the document should be referenced in these village design guides. The document can be downloaded via the following link: http://www.sportengland.org/activedesign

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